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f990d1abbe9eece373b838802e8f4c4a so cute funny stuff
UK government gives protection to seabirds, Mars pledges $1 billion to reducing greenhouse emissions, and NY makes school lunches free for all 1.1 million students

Part of the coastline in Northumberland which is one of the most important sites in the UK for seabirds such as Arctic terns and Atlantic puffins has been given

greater protection by government conservation body Natural England; Mars, the chocolate manufacturer, has pledged to put $1 billion towards cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 67% across its supply chain by 2050; and New York is removing the stigma of free lunch by making it available to all 1.1 million students.

These stories and more in today's Solutions Digest:

• How around 20 farms and several mine rehabilitation sites in Central NSW use biosolids from human poo to fertilise their soil. It is a byproduct of a sewerage treatment process that is also creating renewable energy. Read more here

• How Mars, the chocolate manufacturer, has pledged to put $1 billion towards cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 67% across its supply chain by 2050. Read more here

• How U.S. conservationists have turned their attention to cities and launched online education and bat image makeover campaigns to make urban areas (and the humans within them) more bat-friendly. Read more here

• VIDEO: How New York's Green City Force is teaching NYC residents environmental sustainability practices and learning essential job skills for the workforce. View here

• How part of the coastline in Northumberland which is one of the most important sites in the UK for seabirds such as Arctic terns and Atlantic puffins has been given greater protection by government conservation body Natural England. Read more here 

• VIDEO: How a Kenyan company is turning human faeces into fuel briquettes. View here

• How New York is removing the stigma of free lunch by making it available to all 1.1 million students. Read more here

• How the landholder-first approach reflects an evolving recognition by scientists of the value of engaging with local experts to help understand and solve conservation problems. Read more here

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